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Era la mia "virtute al cor ristretta, Per far" ivi, e ne gli occki sue difese ; Quando 7 colpo mortal laggiu discese Ove solea spuntarsi ogni saetta. Perd turbata nel primiero assalto, Non ebbe tanto ne vigor, nh spazio, Che potesse al bisogno pre?

There to defend the pass bright eyes might gain; When his dread archery was pour'd amain Where blunted erst had fallen evVy dart. Scar'd at the sudden brisk attack, I found Nor time, nor vigour to repel the foe With weapons suited to the direful need ; No kind protection of rough rising ground. Where from defeat I might securely speed, "Which fain I would e'en now, but ah, no method know! Ed h SI speiitn ogni. Qual xaghezza di lauro? Potera, e 7iuda vai, Filosojia, Dice la turba al vil guadagno intesa.

Intemp'raxce, slumber, and the slothful down Have chas'd each virtue from this world away; Hence is our nature nearly led astray From its due course, by habitude o'erthrown: Those kindly lights of heav'n so dim are grown, Which shed o'er human life instruction's ray ; That him with scornful wonder they survey, Who would draw forth the stream of Helicon.

Few on thy chosen road will thee attend ; Yet let it more incite thee, gentle friend, To prosecute thy high-conceiv'd emprise. PIE de colli, ove la bella vesta Prese delle terrene membra pria La doniia, che colui cfi a te ne 'nvia, Spesso dal sonno lagrimando desta: Libere in pace passavam per quest a Vita mortal, cK ogni animal desia, Senza sospetto di trovar jra via Cosa cK al nostf andar fosse molest a.

Che rendetta e di lid cIC a cio? Leaving another with sercncness fraujilit. Nay, e'en from death, one comfort we obtain ; That vengeance follows him who sent us here j Another's utmost thraldom doom'd to bear. Bound he now lies with a still stronger chain. Mentr io portava i be' pensier celati, C hanno la mente desiando morta, Vidivi di pietate ornare il volto: Wherefore, my unkind fair-one, say, Whether the sun fierce darts his ray, Or whether gloom o'erspreads the sky.

That envious veil is ne'er thrown by ; Though well you read my heart, and knew How much I long'd your charms to view? While I conceal' d each tender thought, That my fond mind's destruction wrought. Your face with pity sweetly shone ; But, when Love made my passion known, Your sunny locks w ere seen no more, Nor smil'd your eyes as heretofore ; Behind a jealous cloud rctir'd Those beauties which I most admir'd.

And shall a veil thus rule my fate? Or cold be felt, art doom'd to prove Fatal to me, shadowing the lights I love! That I might view through each declining year Your beauteous eyes no longer bright remain ; Your locks of fine gold silver whiteness gain ; Those gay-green robes, the wreaths you wont to wear Thrown by ; and, ah, faded that face so fair, Which makes me slow, and fearful to complain!

Love then at least such daring should inspire, That of the sufferings I've been doom'd to feel The years, days, hours I might to you reveal. And, though the period suit not fond desire, Yet the soft griefs that in my bosom rise Still may she mitigate with tardy sighs.

Ma trovo peso nan dalle mie braccia, Ne orra da polir con la mia lima: Perd V ingegno, che sua for za estima, NeW fiperazion tutto s" agghiaccia. Pin volte gia per dir le lahbra apersi; Poi rimase la voce in mezzo 'I petto. Ma qual saon poria mai salir tant' alto? Pill volte incoinineiai di scriver versi: Asham'd sometimes thy beauties should remain As yet unsung, sweet lady, in my rhyme ; When first I saw thee I recall the time.

Pleasing as none shall ever please again. But no fit polisli can my verse attain, Not mine is strength to try the task sublime: My genius, measuring its pow'r to climb. From such attempt doth prudently refi-ain. Full oft I op'd my lips to chant thy name ; Then in mid utterance tlie lay was lost: But say what muse can dare so bold a flight? Full oft I strove in measure to endite j But ah, the j cn, the hanci, the vein I boast At once were vanquish'd by the mighty theme!

Jmille Jiate, o dolce mia guerrera, Per aver cd hegli occhi vostri pace, V aggio profferto il cor: E se di lui fori altra donna spera; Vive in speranza debile, e fallace: Expects a stranger fair that heart to gain ; In frail, fallacious hopes will she confide: It never more to me can be allied ; Since what you scorn, dear lady, I disdain. In its sad exile if no aid you lend, Banisird by me ; and it can neither stay Alone, nor yet another's call obey ; Its vital course must hasten to its end: Poi, quand' io veggio Jiammeggiar le stelle, Vo lagrimando, e desiando il giorno.

JbiACH creature, on whose wakeful eyes The bright sun pours his golden fire. By clay a destin'd toil pursues ; And, when heav'n's lamps illnnie the skies, All to some haunt for rest retire, Till a fresh dawn that toil renews. Come costei, cU i piango aW ombra, e al sole: Prima cK i torni a voi, lucenti stelle, O tomi gill nelP amorosa selva Lassando il corpo, chejia trita terra ; Vedess' io in lei pieta: O'er other climes to dart its rays ; Pensive those cruel stars I view, Which influence thus my am'rous fate ; And imprecate that beauty's blaze, Which o'er my form such wildness threw.

No forest surely in its glooms Nurtures a savage so unkind As she, who bids these sorrows flow: Ere up to you, bright orbs, I fly, Or to Love's bow'r speed down my way. While here my mould'ring limbs remain ; Let me her pity once espy: Thus, rich in bliss, one little day Shall recompense whole years of pain.

Ma 10 sard sotterra i? But I shall cast this mortal veil on earth, And stars shall gild the noon, ere such bright scenes have birth. E gli amanti pungea quella stagione Che per usanza a lagrimar gli appella ; Quando mia speme gia condotta al verde Giunse nel cor, non per Viisata via ; Che 7 sonno tenea chiiisa, e 7 dolor molle ; Quanto cangiata, oinih, da quel di pria!

Veder guati occhi ancor non ti si iolle. Beside her kindled hearth the housewife dame, Half-drest, and slipshod 'gan her distaff ply: And now the wonted hour of woe drew nigh. That wakes to tears the lover from his dream: When my sweet hope unto my mind appeared, Not in the custom'd way unto my sight; For grief had bath'd my lids, and sleep had weigh'd ; Ah me, how chang'd tha. Apollo; 5' aticor five il htl desio, Che f injiammava alle Thessalice onde ; E se non hai C amate ch'iomc blonde Volgendo gU anni gili poste in obblio ; Dal pigro gielo, e dnl tempo aspro, e rio, Che dura qiianto 7 tuo liso.

E per vert it dell' ajyiorosa speme Che ti sostenne nella vita acerba, Di jue. OoLo, e pensoso i piu deserti cmnpi Vo misurando a passi tardiy e lenti ; E gli occhi porto per fuggir intenti Dove vestigio uman la rena stampi. Altro schermo non trovo che mi scampi Dal manifesto accorger delle genti: To shield me from th' observant world's survey No other refuge I discover near: For all my acts such lack of joyancc wear.

They show without what fires within me prey: Nay, well I ween that ever is reveal'd To mountain, river, forest, and to plain My woe of life, from mortal race conceal'd.

But roush, and rugned haunts I seek in vain i Still in thoie haunts am I by I. XL mio avversario ; i? Certo se xi riinembra di Narcisso ; QaestOy e quel corse, ad an terniino xan? But to your glass if I transferr'd could be. Not your proud image only should you see. Becoming self-enamour'd, to my cost. Rightly reflect upon Narcissus' fate; Both his, and vours a like event await: Although no soil has Avorth so choice a flow'r to boast. Che quando piii 7 tuo ajuto mi bisogna Per dima?

Poi fug git e dinajizi alia ynia pace. Sola la I'isia 7nia del cor non tace. Although from falsehood I did thee restrain With all my povv'r, and paid thee honour due, Ungrateful tongue ; yet never did accrue Honour from thee, but shame, and fierce disdain: Most art thou cold, when most I want the strain Thy aid should lend while I for pity sue ; And all thy utt'rance is imperfect too, When thou dost speak, and as the dreamer's vain.

Ye too, sad tears, throughout each ling'ring night Upon me wait, w hen I alone would stay ; But, needed by my peace, you take your flight: And, all so prompt anguish, and grief t' impart. You sighs, then slow, and broken breathe your way Aly looks alone truly reveal my heart. E poi cosi soletta Aljin di sua giornata Talora e consolata Zy alcun breve riposo ; ov' ella obblia La noja, e 7 mal della passata via. Then, tlie day's journey o'er, she'll steep Her sense awhile in grateful sleep ; Forgetting all the pain, and peril past; But I, alas!

While lights eternal orb rolls from us fast. Ma chi 'vuoly si rallegri ad ora ad ora: The hind collects his tools, and carols gay; Then spreads his board with frugal fare, Such as those homely acorns were, Which all revere, yet casting them away. Taste no delight, no momentary rest!

And scatter darkness o'r the eastern skies ; Rising, his custom'd crook he takes, The beech-wood, fountain, plain forsakes, As calmly homeward with his flock he hies. Remote from man, then on his bed In cot, or cave, with fresh leaves spread, He courts soft slumber, and suspense from care , While thou, fell Love, bidst me pursue That voice, those footsteps which subdue My soul J yet movest not th' obdurate fair!

E duolmi, di ogni giorno arroge al danno: CK i son gia pur crescendo in quest a voglia Ben presso al decim anno ; Ne poss' indovmar chi me ne scioglia. But never will my sorrows cease, Successive days their sum ini reuse, Though just ten annual suns have mark'd my pain Say, to this bosom's poignant grief Who shall adiiiinisttT reHet? Say, who at lenglii shall Iree me from my chain? Ne so ben' anco, che di lei mi creda. Why at that hour will no one stay My sighs, or bear my yoke away?

Wretch that I was, to fix my sight First on that face with such delight, Till on my tliought its charms were strong imprest, Which force shall not efface, nor art. Ere from this frame my soul dispart! Nor know I then if passion's vot'ries rest. Tra Ic chiome dell or nascose il laccio Al qual mi strinse A? Though cruelty denies my view Those charms which led me first to love ; To passion yet will I be true, Nor shall my will rebellious prove.

Amid the curls of golden hair, That wave those beauteous temples round, Cupid spread craftily the snare With which my captive heart he bound: And from those eyes he caught the ray.

Which thaw'd the ice that fenc'd my breast. Chasing all other thoughts away With brightness suddenly imprest. Ma perche ben morendo onor s' acquista ; Per morte, ne per doglia Non fo' che da tal nodo Amor mi scioglia.

And change to sadness past dehght. A glorious death by all is priz'd ; 'Tis death alone shall break my chain: O be love's timid wail despis'd! Lovers should nobly suffer pain. Con qucste alzato vengo a dire or cose, CIC ho portate 7iel cor gran tempo ascose. But let my tender wail There, where it ought, deserv'd attention claim, That wail which e'en in silence we may trace. And he, of you who sings.

Such courteous habit bv the strain is tausrht, That, borne on amVous wings, He soars above tlic reach of vulgar thought: Exalted thus, I venture to reveal U'hat long my cautious heart has labour'd to conceal. Principio del mio dolce stato rio, Altri che voiy so ben, che non in intende, Quando a gli ardenti rai neve divegno ; Vostro gentile sdegno Forse cK allor mia indegnitate offende. That urges, since I view'd What fancy to the sight before ne'er gave, What ne'er before grac'd mine, or higher lays.

Bright authors of my sadly-pleasing state, That you alone conceive me, well I know,. When to your fierce beams I become as snow! Your elegant disdain Haply then kindles at my worthless strain. Did not this dread create Some mitigation of my bosom's heat. Death would be bliss: Ma la paura un poco s Che 7 sangue vago per le vene agghiaccia ; Risalda 7 cor, perche piu tempo awampi. A hi dolorosa sorte! Lo star mi strugge, e 7 fuggir non rri aita.

Ma ; se maggior paura Non ni affrenasse ; via corta, e spedita Trarrebbe a Jin quest' aspra pcna, e dura ; E la colpa e di tal che non ha cwa. But that some fear restrains, Which chills the current circling through my veins ; Strength' ning this heart, that it may suffer long.

O hills, O vales, O forests, floods, and fields, Ye who have witness'd how my sad life flows, Oft have ye heard me call on death for aid. Ah, state surcharged with woes 1 To stay destroys, and flight no succour yields. But had not higher dread Withheld, some sudden effort I had made. To end my sorrows, and protracted pains, Of which the beauteous cause insensible remains. Ma quant e "volte a me vi rivolgete, Conoscete in altrui quel che voi siete. Let me proceed where pleasure may invite. But, frequent as you bend your beams on me, What influence you possess you in anotlier see.

Felice V alma che per voi sospira, Lumi del del ; per li quali io ringrazio La vita, che per altro non irC e a grado. Oime ; perche si rado Mi date quel, dond' io mai non son sazio? Perche non piu sovente Mirate, quaV amor di me fa strazio? E perche mi spogliate i?

As unto him on whom its glories shine! The heart had then o'erflown With joy unbounded, such as is denied Unto that nature which its acts doth guide. How happy is the soul for you that sighs. Celestial lights ; which lend a charm to life, And make me bless what else I should not prize 1 Ah why, so seldom why Afford what ne'er can cause satiety? More often to your sight Why not bring Love, who holds me constant strife?

And why so soon of joys despoil me quite, Which ever and anon my tranced soul delight? Quel tanto a me, non piu, del viter giova. H se questo mio ben durasse alquanto, Nullo stato agguagliarsi al mio potrebbe: Ma forsc altrui farebbe Intidoy e me superbo I ' onor tanto: O might the blessing of duration prove, Not equalfd then could my condition be! But this would haply move In others envy, in myself vain pride. That pain should be allied To pleasure is, alas, decreed above!

Then, stifling all the ardour of desire, Homeward I turn my thoughts, and in myself retire. Fugge al tostro apparire angoscia, e noja ; E nel vostro partir tornano inseme: Ma perchh la memoria innamorata Chiude lor poi V entrata ; Di la non vanno dalle parti estreme: Ondc s alcun hcl frutto Nasce di me ; da voi vien piima il se7ne: Hence I aspire to frame Lays whereon hope may build a deathless name, When in the tomb my dust shall lie conceal'd.

At your approach anguish, and sorrow fly ; These as your beams retire again draw nigh: Yet outward acts their influence ne'er betray ; For doting memory Dwells on the past, and chases them away. Whatever then of worth My genius ripens owes to you its birth: To you all honour, and all praise is due ; Myself a barren soil, and cultur'd but by you. Perd sia certa di non esser sola.

Trust me, thou shalt ere long a sister song acquire. Che cid cK altri han piu caro, a me fan vile. Perd che 'w vista ella si mostra umile, Promettendomi pace neW aspetto.

Pigmalion, quanto lodar ti dei DelC nnmagine tua, se mille volte iV' avesti quel, cli i sot una vorrei! That bhss had giv'n to higher bhss distaste: For, when such meekness in her look was trac'd, 'Twould seem she soon to kindness might inchne. But, urging converse with the portray'd fair, Methinks she deigns attention to my pray'r, Though wanting to reply the pow'r of voice.

Non era 7 andar suo cosa mortak, Ma d' angelica forma ; e le parole Sonavan altro, che pur roce umana. Ah then it seem'd her face wore pity's hue. Yet haply fancy my fond sense betray' d ; Nor strange that I, in whose varm heart wns laid Love's fuel, suddenly enkindled grew!

Not like a mortal's did her step appear, Angelic was her form ; her voice, methought, Pour'd more than human accents on the ear, A living sun was what my vision caught, A spirit pure ; and though not such still found, Unbending of the bow ne er heals the wound. Piangan le rime ancor, piangano i versi ; Per che 7 nostro amoroso Messer Cino Novellamente s' e da noi partito.

Such limits let not my affliction keep. As may the solace of soft tears restrain ; And, to relieve my bosom of its pain, Be all my sighs tumultuous, utter'd deep!

Let song itself, and votaries of verse, Breathe mournful accents o'er our Cino's bier, Who late is gone to number with the blest!

O weep, Pistoia, weep your sons perverse ; Its choicest habitant has fled our sphere. And heav'n may glory in its welcome guest! Rise fra gente lagrimosa, e mesta, Per isfogare il suo acerho despitto: E cosi avvtn che f animo ciascima Sua passion sotto 7 contrario manto Ricopre con la vista or chiara, or bruua.

Pero, 6'' alcuna volt a i' rido, oc anto ; Facciol, perch' i' non ho se non quest' una Via da celare il mio angoscioso pianto. When Egypt's traitor Pompey's honoured head To Cesar sent ; then, records so relate, To shroud a gladness manifestly great. Some feigned tears the specious monarch shed: And, when misfortune her dark mantle spread O'er Hannibal, and his afflicted state, He laugh'd midst those who wept their adverse fate, That rank despite to wreak defeat had bred: Thus dotli the mind oft variously conceal Its sev'ral passions by a different veil ; Now with a countenance that's sad, now gay: Sol due persone cheggio ; e vorrei V una Col cor ver me pacificato, e umile ; V altro col pie, si come mai fu, saldo.

Yes, out of impious Babylon I 'm flown, Whence flown all shame, whence banish'd is all good, That nurse of error, and of guilt th' abode, To lengthen out a life which else were gone: There as Love prompts, while wandering alone, I now a garland weave, and now an ode ; With him I commune, and in pensive mood Hope better times ; this only checks my moan.

Nor for tlie throng, nor fortune do I care, Nor for myself, nor sublunary things ; No ardour outwardly, or inly springs: I ask two persons only ; let my fair For me a kind, and tender heart maintain; And be my friend secure in his high post again.

Ma tidil' io, eh' altrove non m' qffiso. Fora uno sdegtio a lato a quel clC i dico. Chinava a terra il bel guardo gentile ; E tacendo dicea, com'' a me parre, Chi 7w' allontana il mio fedele amico? Then how in paradise the blessed view Each other I perceiv'd ; e'en so took place The gentle sentiment none else could trace, Save me, whose gaze no other object knew.

The most angelic look that face could wear, The mildest manners female love could show, Compar'd with what I sing might scorn appear ; To earth she calmly bent her decent brow; And silently she said, or seem'd to say, ' Who bears far hence mv faithful friend away-'' 78 CANZONE VL Se 7 pensier che mi strugge, Colli e pungent Cy e soldo, Cost nestisse d' un color conforme.: Men solitarie V orme For an de' miei pie lassi Per campagne, e per colli: Men gli occhi ad ogni or molli ; Ardendo lei che come un ghiaccio stassi ; E non lassa in me dramma, Che non sia foco, e fiamma.

O THAT my cheeks were taught By the fond, wasting thought To wear such hues as could its influence speak ; Then the dear, scornful fair Might all my ardour share ; And where Love slumbers now he might awake! Less oft the hill, and mead My wearied feet should tread ; Less oft perhaps these eyes with tears should stream ; If she, who cold as snow. With equal fire would glow j She who dissolves me, and converts to flame.

Ma non sempre alia scorza Ramo, nh 'n Jior, ne 'n foglia Mostra di fuor sua natural virtude. Nor leaves, nor blossoms show, Nor rind, upon the bough, What is the nature which thereto belongs. Love, and those beauteous eyes, Beneath whose shade he lies, Discover all the heart can comprehend: When vented are my cares In loud complaints, and tears ; These harm myself, and others those offend.

A voter poi ritrarla, Per me non basto ; e par cK io me ne stempre. Some pow'r appears to trace Within me Laura's face, Whispers her name ; and strait in verse I strive To picture her again, But the fond effort's vain: Me of my solace thus doth fate deprive. But if, of beauty vain. She treats me with disdain ; Do thou, O verdant shore, attend my sighs: Let them so freely flow, That all the world may know, My sorrow thou at least didst not despise!

Onde 7 cor lasso riede Col tormentoso Jianco A partir teco i lor pensier nascosti, Cosl avestu riposti De bei vestigi sparsi Ancor trcL jiori, e V erha: Che la mia 'vila acerba Lagrimando trorjosse ove acquetarsi.

My sunk soul, and worn heart Now seek thee, to impart The secret griefs that on my passion wait. If on thy margent green, Or midst thy flow'rs, were seen Some traces of her footsteps ling'ring there ; My wearied life 'twould cheer, Bitter'd with many a tear: Ah, now what means are left to sooth my care?

Each plant, and scented bloom I gather, seems to come From where she wander'd on the customM shore Oftimes in this retreat A fresh, and fragrant seat She found ; at least so fancy's vision shows: And never let truth seek Th' illusion dear to break O spirit blest, from whom such magick flows! Credo che tel conoschi: Rimanti in questi boschi. Solicit not renown Throughout the busy town, But dwell within the shade that gave thee birth.

Donna, merce chiamando ; e voi non cale. Dagli occhi vostri uscio 7 colpo mortahy Contra cui non mi val tempo, ne loco: Love makes me as the target for his dart, As snow in sunshine, or as wax in flame. Or gale-driv'n cloud ; and, Laura, on thy name I call, but thou no pity wilt impart. Thy radiant eyes first caus'd my bosom's smart ; No time, no place can shield me from their beam ; From thee but, ah, thou treat'st it as a dream! Proceed the torments of my suff'ring heart.

Each thought's an arrow, and thy face a sun, My passion's flame: Thy heav'nly song, thy speech with which I'm won. All thy sweet breathings of such strong controul, Form the dear gale that bears away my soul. E nulla stringo, e tutto 7 mondo abbraccio. Tal TVL ha in prigion, che non wH apre, ne serra ; Ne per suo mi riten, ne scioglie il laccio ; E non m ancide Amor, e non mi sferra ; Nb mi vuol "vivo, ne mi trae d impaccio.

Pascomi di dolor; piangendo rido ; Egualmente mi spiace mortc, e vita. In questo stato son, donna, per vui. Warfare I cannot wage, yet know not peace; I fear, I hope, I burn, I freeze again ; Mount to the skies, then bow to earth my face ; Grasp the whole world, yet nothing I obtain.

His pris'ner Love nor frees, nor will detain ; In toils he holds me not, nor will release ; He slays me not, nor 3'ct will he unchain ; Nor joy allows, nor lets my sorrow cease. Sightless I see my fair ; though mute, I mourn ; I scorn existence, and yet court its stay ; Detest myself, and for another burn ; By grief I'm nurtur'd ; and, though tearful, gay ; Death I despise, and life alike I hate: Such, lady, dost thou make my wayward state!

Nido di tradimenti ; in cui si cova Quant mal per lo mondo oggi si spatide: Gia nonfostu nudrita in piume al rezzo ; Ma nuda al vento, e scalzafra li stecchi: Or vivi SI, cK a Dio 7ie venga il lezzo. May fire from heav'n rain down upon thy liead.

Nest of all treachery, in m hich is bred Whate'er of sin now through the world doth fly ; Of wine the slave, of sloth, of gluttony ; With sensuality's excesses fed! Erewhile thou wert not sheltered, nurs'd on down ; Dut naked, barefoot on the straw wert thrown; Now rank to Heav'n ascends thy hfe unclean. Che piu m' arde 7 desio, Quanto piu la speranza ni assicura. From time to time less cruelty I trace In her sweet smile, and form divinely fair ; Less clouded doth appear The heav'n of her fine eyes, and lovely face.

What then at last avail to me those sighs, Which from my sorrows flow, And in my semblance show The life of anguish, and despair I lead? If towards her perchance I bend mine eyes, Some solace to bestow Upon my bosom's woe ; Methinks Love takes my part, and lends me aid: Yet still I cannot find the conflict stay'd, Nor tranquil is my heart in evVy state: Ne mortal vista mai luce divina Vinse ; come la mia quel raggio altero Del bel dolce soave bianco, e nero.

In che i suoi strali Amor dora, ed affina. Cieco non gia, ma faretrato il txggo ; Nudo, se non quanto vergogna il vela ; Garzofi con V all, non pinto, ma vivo. Indi mi mostra quel cK a molti cela: JN o wearied n7ariner to port e'er fled From the dark billow, when some tempest's nigh ; As from tumultuous gloomy thoughts I fly, Thoughts by the force of goading passion bred: Nor wrathful glance of heav'n so surely sped Destruction to man's sight ; as does that eye, Within whose bright black orb love's Deity Sharpens each dart, and tips with gold its head.

Enthron'd in radiance there he sits, not blind, Quiver'd, and naked, or by shame just veil'd, A live, not fabled boy, with changeful wing; Thence unto me he lends instruction kind, And arts of verse from meaner bards conceal'd: Thus am I taught whate'er of love I write, or sing. Ed udi sospirando dir par ok, Che farian gir i monti, e star i Jiumi.

Amor, senno, "valor, pietate, e doglia Facean piangendo un pin dolce concento U ogni altro, che nel mondo udir si soglia: Yes, I beheld on earth angelick grace, And charms divine which mortals rarely see, Such as both glad, and pain the memory ; Vain, light, unreal is all else I trace: Tears I saw shower'd from those fine eyes apace, Of which the sun oftimes might envious be ; Accents I heard sigh'd forth so movingly, As to stay floods, or mountains to displace.

Love, and good-sense, firmness, with pity join'd. And wailful grief a sweeter concert made Than ever yet was pour'd on human ear: And heav'n unto the musick so inclin'd, That not a leaf was seen to stir the shade ; Such melody had fraught the winds, the atmosphere. In qual parte del cier, in quale idea. Benche la somma h di mia rnorte rea. Per divina bellezza indarno mira Chi gli occhi di costei giamrnai non ride.

Come soaxsemente ella gli gira. Non sa com Amor sana, e come ancide, Chi non sa come dolce ella sospira, E come dolce parla, e dolce jide. Say from what part of heav'n 'twas Nature drew, From what idea, that so perfect mould To form such features, bidding us beliold, In charms below, what she above could do?

What heart such nuin'rous virtues can unfold? Although the chiefest all my fond hopes slew. He for celestial charms njay look in vain, Who has not seen my fair one's radiant eyes, And felt their glances pleasingly beguile.

How Love can heal his wounds, then wound again, He only knows, who knows how sweet her sighs, How sweet her converse, and how sweet her smile. Non fia in voi scoglio o? G"AY joyous blooms, and herbage glad with show'rs O'er which my pensive fair was wont to stray I You plain, who listen her melodious lay, As her fair feet imprint your waste of flow'rs!

Ye shrubs so spruce ; ye green, unfolding bow'rs ; Ye violets clad in am'rous, pale array ; You shadowy grove, gilded by beauty's ray, Whose top made proud majestically tow'rs! O, translucent stream, Bathing her lovely face, her eyes so clear, While of their living light you catch the beam! I envy ye her actions chaste, and dear: No rock shall stud your soil, but what shall learn Henceforth with passion strong as mine to burn.

Ond' io non pote' mai formar parola, CK altro che da me stesso fosse iiitesa ; Cost ivL ha fatto Amor tremante, e fioco: Oft as her angel face compassion wore, With tears whose eloquence scarce fails to move, With bland and courteous speech, I boldly strove To sooth my foe, and in meek guise implore: Hence 'tis, whene'er my lips would silence break, Scarce can I hear the accents which 1 vent, By passion render'd spiritless, and weak.

Ah, now I find that fondness to excess Fetters the tongue, and ovcrpow'rs intent: Faint is the tianic that language can express! Ma lo spirto, cK iv entro si nasconde, Non cur a ne di tua, ne d' altrui forza: In spite of sails, or oars, of sea, or air. Ved'i hen, quanta in lei dolcezza pione: Sec, with what cunning, crimson, pearls and gold, Her chosen vest, ne'er yet seen elsewhere, grace: Court her fair feet to press them, and to tread ; The golden stars that stud yon beauteous sky, Cheer'd by her presence, and her smiles, assume Superior lustre, and serenity.

Per ritrovar ove 7 cor lasso appoggiy Fuggo dal mio natio dolce aere Tosco: Per far lume al pensier torbido, e fosco, Cerco 7 mio sole ; e spero "vederlo oggi: My wearied soul to sooth, I bid adieu To those dear Tuscan haunts I first surveyed ; And, to dispel the gloom around me spread, I hope this day my cheering sun to view: Whose sweet attraction is so strong, so great, That Love again compels me to its light ; Tlien he so dazzles me, that vain were flight.

Le quail ella spargca si dclcemcnte, E raccogliea con si leggiadri modi, Che ripensando ancor trcma la mcntc. Torsele il tempo po in piu saldi nodi ; E strinse 7 cor d' iin laccio si posse ite, Che morte sola Jia cK indi lo snodi. MurmVing delightful through the verdant grove, To fond remembrance brings the time, when Love First gave his deep, although delightful wound ; Gave me to view that beauteous face, ne'er found Vcil'd, as disdain, or jealousy might move; To view her locks that shone briirht gold above, Then loose, but now with pearls and jewels bound Those locks she sweetly scattcr'd to the wind, And then coil'd up again so gracefully, That but to think on it still thrills the sense.

These time has in more sober braids confin'd ; And bound my heart with such a pow'rful tie, That dciith alone can disengage it thence. Da td due luci e V itit elicit o offeso, E di tanta dolcezza oppresso, e stanco. And on those shoulders shine such wreaths of hair. Whose witching tangles my poor heart ensnare. Cost arcss' io del bel velo altrettanto. O incostanza delV umane cose I Pur quest efurto; e xitn ch' i' me tie spoglie.

Sweet fingers, seeming pearls of orient hue, To my wounds only cruel, fingers fine! Love, who towards me kindness doth design. For once permits ye naked to our view. Thou glove most dear, most elegant, and white, Encasing ivVy tinted with the rose ; jNIore precious covering ne'er met mortal sight! Would I such portion of thy veil had gain'd! O flectinii 2;ifts which fortune's hand bestows! Ljsso, cK I ardo, ed altri non me 7 crede: Si crede ogni uoiiiy se noji sola colei, Che sovr ogiii altra, e ch' i sola vorrei: Ella non par che 7 creda, e si se 7 vede: Quest' arder mio, di che vi cal si poco, E i vostri otiori in mic rime diffusi Ne poriaii infiammar fors ancor milk: CK I veggio nel pensier, dolce mio foco, Fredda una lingua, e duo begU occhi chiusi Rimaner dopo noi pien difaville.

Alas, with ardour past belief I glow! None doubt this truth, except one only fair, Who all excels, for whom alone I care ; She plainly sees, yet disbelieves my woe. O, poor in faith, but rich in charms! Were I not fated by my baleful star, For me from pity's fount might favour flow.

My flame, of which thou tak'st so little heed, And thy high praises pour'd through all my song. O'er many a breast may future influence spread: These, my sweet fair, so warns prophetic thought, ClosYi thy bright eye, and mute tliy poet's tongue.

E'en after death shall still witli sparks be fraught. Alma, non ti lagnar: Per che non venne " Ella pi ti tardi, oi'ver io piu per tempo? Sweet scorn, sweet anger, and sweet misery, Forgiveness sweet, sweet burden, and sweet ill ; Sweet accents that mine ear so sweetly thrill.

That sweedy bland, now sweetly fierce can be. Mourn not, my soul, but suffer silently ; And those embitter d sweets your heart that fill With the sweet honour blend of loving still Her whom I told: Forse, O che spero!

Baciale 7 piede, o la man bella, e bianca: Impetuous flood, that from the Alps' rude head, Eating around thee, dost thy name obtain ; Anxious Hke me both night, and day to gain Where thee pure nature, and me love doth lead ; Pour on: Where most serenity the skies doth spread! There beams mv radiant sun of cheerin" rav, Which decks thy left banks, and gems o'er with flowVs; E'en now, vain thought!

Kiss then her feet, her hand so beauteous fair ; In place of language let thy kiss declare Strong is my will, though feeble are my pow'rs. Grazie, chb a pochi 7 ciel largo destina: Sotto biondi capei canuta mente ; jE' n umil donna alta belta divina: Leggiadria singular e, e pdlegrina ; E 7 catitar die neW anima s'l sente: Da questi magi trasformato fui. Quel far le stelle, e quest a sparir lui. HE birds' sweet wail, their renovated song, At break of morn, make all the vales resound ; With lapse of crystal waters pouring round, In clear swift runnels, tlie fresh shores among.

Botli suns I've seen at once uplift their ray; This drives the radiance of the stars away. But that whicii gilds my life eclipses e'en his light. Onde le perk, in cU ei f range, ed affrena Dolci parole, oneste, e pellegrine? Onde tante bellezze, e si divine Di quellafronte piu che 7 ciel sere7ia?

Da quali angeli mosse, e di qual spera Quel celeste cantar cite mi disface St, che iri avanza omai da disfar poco? Di qual sol nacque V alma luce altera Di que begli occhi, ond' V ho guerra, c pace; Che mi cuocono 7 cor in ghiaccio, e 'nfoco?

A Wpience could Love take the gold, and from what vein, To form those bright twin locks? What thorn could grow Those roses? And what mead that white bestow Of the fresh dews, which pulse and breath obtain? Wlience came those pearls that modestly restrain Accents which courteous, sweet, and rare can flow? And whence those charms, that so divinely show, Spread oer a face serene as heav'n's blue plain?

Taught by what angel, or what tuneful sphere, Was that celestial song, which doth dispense Sucli potent magick to the ravishM ear? What sun illum'd those bright commanding eyes, Which now look peaceful, now in hostile guise ; Xow torture me with liope, and now with fear? Me nd ; ma 7 sol che 7 cor rri arde, e trastulla.

Quel pud solo addolcir la doglia mia. When sinks in ocean the sun's golden wain, And my mind darkens, and th' expanse of air ; Soon beam in heav'n the moon, and each bright star, My nightly earnest of approaching pain: I then recount, ah wretched me! I know not rest ; my couch soft slumber flies: I wail, I sigh, and till the dawn shed tears Forc'd from my sad soul through my streaming eyes. Then the dun sky morn gilds with cheerful light. But glads not me.

S UNA fede amorosa, un cor nonjinto, Un languir dolce, un desiar cortese ; S' oneste voglie in gentilfoco accese ; S' un lungo error in cieco laberinfo ; Se nellafronte ogni pensier dipinto, Od in voci interrotte appena intese.

Corn" animal che spesso adombre, e 'ncespe: Ch' or mcl par ritrovar; ed or ni accorgo, CK i ' we son lunge: Aerfelice, col bel xivo raggio Rimanti: Alethinks I find her now, and now perceive She's distant ; now I soar, and now descend ; Now what I wish, now what is true believe. Stay and enjoy, blest air, the living beam ; And thou, O rapid, and translucent stream. Why can't I change my course, and thine attend? Che tanti affanni uom mai sotto la luna Non sofferse, quanf io: Count the ocean's finny droves; Count the twinkhng host of stars, Round the night's pale orb that moves ; Count the groves' wing'd choristers ; Count each verdant blade that grows ; Counted then will be my woes.

When shall these eyes cease to weep ; When shall this world-wearied frame, Cover d by the cold sod, sleep? Sure, beneath yon planet's beam, None like me have made such moan ; This to evry bow'r is known. But, ere I shall cease to grieve, Ocean's vast bed shall be dry. Suns their light from moons shall gain, And spring wither on each plain. Pensive, weeping, night and day. From this shore to that I fly, Changeful as the lunar ray ; And, when ev'ning veils the sky, Then my tears might swell the floods, Then my sighs might bow the woods!

O, that in some lone retreat. Like Endymion I were lain ; And that she, who rules my fate. There one night to stay would deign ; Never from his billowy bed More might Phoebus lift his head! QuAL paura ho, quando mi torna a mente Quel giorno, cK i lasciai grave , e pensosa Madonna, e 7 mio cor seco: Deposta avea V usata leggiadria, Le perky e le ghirlande, e i panni alleg7i, E 7 riso, e 7 canto, e U parlar dolce umano. Cost in dubbio lasciai la "cita mia: What dread I feel, when I revolve the day I left my mistress, sad, without repose, My heart too with her: Then were thrown by her custom'd cheerfulness, Iler pearls, her chaplets, and her gay attire, Her song, her laughter, and her mild address j Thus doubtingly I quitted her I love: E se mia mglia in cid fosse compita, Fuor del dolce aere de paesi Toschi Ancor vi' avria tra suoi be' colli foschi So7g'a ; cK a pianger, e cantar m aita.

Ma mia fortuna a me sempre nemica Mi rnsospigne al loco, ov io mi sdegno Veder nel fango il bel tesoro mio: Amor sel 'cide, e sal Madonna, ed io. OTiLL have I sought a life of solitude ; The streams, the fields, the forests know my mind ; That I might scape the sordid, and the blind. Who paths forsake trod by the wise, and good: Fain would I leave, were mine own will pursued.

These Tuscan haunts, and these soft skies behind, Sorga's thick-wooded hills again to find ; And sing, and weep in concert with its flood. But fortune, ever my sore enemy, Compels my steps, where I w ith sorrow see Cast my fair treasure in a vicious soil: Yet less a foe she justly deigns to prove, For once, to me, to Laura, and to love ; Fav'ring my song, my passion with her smile.

Alma real, dignissima d' impero, Se nonfossifra noi scesa si tardo. Per "coi conxen cli io arda, en toi respire: Ma 7 vento 7ie portava le parole.

Ah mc, that lovely look! That gay demeanor blent with dignity! That speech, which could the soul from discord free, And to ingenuous could convert the base! Ah me, that smile by which the dart took place, Whence death ; nor hope 1 other destiny! Spirit, that worthy of a realm mightst be. Less late adorning our unworthy race! For you I still will burn, for you respire ; Since yours through life I've been: My soul you fill'd with hope, and with desire, When last to these delighted eyes you liv'd: But now those words are all dispers'd in air.

Ohe debh' iofar; che mi consigli, Amore? Tempo e ben di morire ; Ed ho tardato piu, cJi i non vorrei. Madonna e morta, ed ha seco 7 mio core ; E volendol seguirey Inter romper conven quest" anni rei: Perche mai vsder lei Di qua non spero, e V aspettar rn e noja, Poscia, ch' ogni mia gioja Per lo suo dipartire in pianto e folta ; Ogni dolcezza di mia vita e tolta. Full time it is to die: And longer than I wish have I delay'd.

My mistress is no more, and with her gone my heart; To follow her, I must need Break short the course of my afflictive years: To view her here helow I ne'er can hope ; and irksome 'tis to wait. Since that my ev'ry joy By her departure unto tears is turn'd ; Of all its sweets my life has been depriv'd.

Ed in un punto? And in one instant was its sun obscur'd. What genius can with words Rightly describe my lamentable state? Ah, blind, ungrateful world. Thou hast indeed just cause with me to mourn; That beauty, thou didst hold, with her is fled! Perche cosa si bella Devea 7 cieV adornar di sua presenza. Questo ni avanza di cotanta spenc ; E questo solo ancor qui mi mantene.

For that, which is so fair, Should with its presence decorate the skies. But I, a wretch who, reft Of her, prize nor myself, nor mortal life, Recall her with my tears: This only of my hope's vast sum remains ; And this alone doth still support me here.

Her viewless form inhabits paradise, Divested of that veil, Which shadow'd while below her bloom of life.

Once more to put it on, And never then to cast it off again ; When so much more divine, And glorious render'd 'twill by us be view'd, As mortal beauty to eternal yields. Quesf e del viver mio V una colonna: This is one pillar that sustains my life ; The other her dear name, That to my heart sounds so delightfully.

She I trust sees it too, who dwells with truth. Ma e raiAona dentro in cotal modo: No wise for her, who, ris'n To so much peace, me has in warfare left ; Such, that should any shut The road to follow her, for some length of time What Love declares to me Alone would check my cutting through the tie: But in this guise he reasons from within.

It suits thee ill with the glad throng to stay. Thou sorrowing widow wrapt in garb of woe. Ma se consentimento e di dcstino ; Che pGss' io piu, se no aver V alma trista, Umidi gli ocehi sempre, e 7 viso chino ; O nostra fit a, cK e si hella in vista ; Com per dc agexolmcnte in un ynattino Quel, che 'n molC anni a gran pena s' acquista! Fah'n that proud Column, falln that Laurel tree, Whose shelter once relieved my wearied mind ; I 'm reft of what I ne'er again shall find, Though ransack'd every shore, and evVy sea: Double the treasure death has torn from me.

In whlcli life's pride was with its pleasure join'd ; Not eastern gems, nor the world's wealth combin'd, Can give it back, nor land, nor royalty. But, if so fate decrees, what can I more. Ah, what is life so lovely to the view! How quickly in one little morn is lost What years have won with labour, and with cost. Non X olendomi Amor perder ancora, Elbe un altro lacciuol fra V erha tesoj E di nov' esca un cdtrofoco acceso, Tal, cJi a gran pena indi scamp at o for a: That burning toil, in which I once was caught, While twice ten years and one I counted o'er.

That grief ne'er fatal proves I now am taught. But Love, who to entangle me still sought, Spread in the treach'rous grass his net once more. So fed the fire with fuel as before, That my escape I hardly could have wrought. And, but that my first woes experience gave, Snared long since, and kindled I had been, And all the more, as I'm become less g-reen: And break my bond ; that flame now fades, and fail?

Veggiofortuna in porto ; e stanco omai II mio nocchief ; e rotte arbore, e sartc ; E i lumi bci, che mirar soglio, spenti. LiiFE flies apace, and tarries not an hour ; While death behind with huge stride journeys on Events now present, with those past and gone. And all the future too, my life doth sour. If aught of joy this sadden'd heart e'er knew, It starts on fancy: Good-fortune's wish'd-for port is now in view ; IVIy pilot's wearied ; rent my mast, and sail ; And those fair lights, that guided once, now fail.

OE lamentar augelli, o "verdifronde Mover soavernente aW aura estiva j O roco mormorar d'l lucid" onde S" ode d' unajiorita, efresca inva ; La V io seggia d' amor pensoso, e scriva ; Lei che 7 ciel ne mo7istrd, terra n asconde, Veo-crio, cd odo, ed intendo: If in sweet accent moans the plaintive bird.

Or green groves whisper soft in summer air, Or from the fresh and flow'ry shore is heard Down the rock's side the fall of waters fair, There where I sit, enditing midst fond care ; Then she, whom heav'n just shew'd us, now interr'd, Whom my fond senses living yet declare. Answers from skies above each sigh preferr'd. Or in forma di Jiinfo, o d' altra diva, Che del pill chiaro fondo di Sorga esca, E pongasi a seder i?

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Porno vintage italien escort girl vaucluse -

Ne'er did fond mother to her darling son, Or zealous spouse to her beloved mate Sage counsel give, in perilous estate. Ov e 7 valor, la conoscenza e 7 senno, U accorta, onesta, lanil, dolce favella? There one night to stay would deign ; Never from his billowy bed More might Phoebus lift his head! Quando 7 sol bugnu in mar l' aurato carro. Botli suns I've seen at once uplift their ray; This drives the radiance of the stars away. And sorrows pour'd from her once-burning eyes. Less late adorning our unworthy race! porno vintage italien escort girl vaucluse Voltaire indeed, who translated the second of these pieces, makes it addressed to the Fountam of Vaucluse ; whereas Vellutello, Tassoiii, and others assert, perhaps er- roneously, that the present Canzone video lesbienne belle trans composed on the banks of the Coulon, a muddy stream about a mile distant from Cabrieres, where the country is not very inviting ; and the second only on the banks of the Sorga. Fiige suspicmi, Cnjus octal um trcvidaiil aias Llaudcie lust run'. Eligc cui dicas, tu mihi sola places. Se lament or augclli, o vcrdi fronde. Why can't I change my course, and thine attend? Some feigned tears the specious monarch shed: Quel vago iirqmllidir, che V dolce riso.

Da quali angeli mosse, e di qual spera Quel celeste cantar cite mi disface St, che iri avanza omai da disfar poco? Di qual sol nacque V alma luce altera Di que begli occhi, ond' V ho guerra, c pace; Che mi cuocono 7 cor in ghiaccio, e 'nfoco? A Wpience could Love take the gold, and from what vein, To form those bright twin locks? What thorn could grow Those roses?

And what mead that white bestow Of the fresh dews, which pulse and breath obtain? Wlience came those pearls that modestly restrain Accents which courteous, sweet, and rare can flow? And whence those charms, that so divinely show, Spread oer a face serene as heav'n's blue plain? Taught by what angel, or what tuneful sphere, Was that celestial song, which doth dispense Sucli potent magick to the ravishM ear? What sun illum'd those bright commanding eyes, Which now look peaceful, now in hostile guise ; Xow torture me with liope, and now with fear?

Me nd ; ma 7 sol che 7 cor rri arde, e trastulla. Quel pud solo addolcir la doglia mia. When sinks in ocean the sun's golden wain, And my mind darkens, and th' expanse of air ; Soon beam in heav'n the moon, and each bright star, My nightly earnest of approaching pain: I then recount, ah wretched me!

I know not rest ; my couch soft slumber flies: I wail, I sigh, and till the dawn shed tears Forc'd from my sad soul through my streaming eyes. Then the dun sky morn gilds with cheerful light. But glads not me. S UNA fede amorosa, un cor nonjinto, Un languir dolce, un desiar cortese ; S' oneste voglie in gentilfoco accese ; S' un lungo error in cieco laberinfo ; Se nellafronte ogni pensier dipinto, Od in voci interrotte appena intese.

Corn" animal che spesso adombre, e 'ncespe: Ch' or mcl par ritrovar; ed or ni accorgo, CK i ' we son lunge: Aerfelice, col bel xivo raggio Rimanti: Alethinks I find her now, and now perceive She's distant ; now I soar, and now descend ; Now what I wish, now what is true believe. Stay and enjoy, blest air, the living beam ; And thou, O rapid, and translucent stream. Why can't I change my course, and thine attend? Che tanti affanni uom mai sotto la luna Non sofferse, quanf io: Count the ocean's finny droves; Count the twinkhng host of stars, Round the night's pale orb that moves ; Count the groves' wing'd choristers ; Count each verdant blade that grows ; Counted then will be my woes.

When shall these eyes cease to weep ; When shall this world-wearied frame, Cover d by the cold sod, sleep? Sure, beneath yon planet's beam, None like me have made such moan ; This to evry bow'r is known. But, ere I shall cease to grieve, Ocean's vast bed shall be dry. Suns their light from moons shall gain, And spring wither on each plain. Pensive, weeping, night and day. From this shore to that I fly, Changeful as the lunar ray ; And, when ev'ning veils the sky, Then my tears might swell the floods, Then my sighs might bow the woods!

O, that in some lone retreat. Like Endymion I were lain ; And that she, who rules my fate. There one night to stay would deign ; Never from his billowy bed More might Phoebus lift his head! QuAL paura ho, quando mi torna a mente Quel giorno, cK i lasciai grave , e pensosa Madonna, e 7 mio cor seco: Deposta avea V usata leggiadria, Le perky e le ghirlande, e i panni alleg7i, E 7 riso, e 7 canto, e U parlar dolce umano. Cost in dubbio lasciai la "cita mia: What dread I feel, when I revolve the day I left my mistress, sad, without repose, My heart too with her: Then were thrown by her custom'd cheerfulness, Iler pearls, her chaplets, and her gay attire, Her song, her laughter, and her mild address j Thus doubtingly I quitted her I love: E se mia mglia in cid fosse compita, Fuor del dolce aere de paesi Toschi Ancor vi' avria tra suoi be' colli foschi So7g'a ; cK a pianger, e cantar m aita.

Ma mia fortuna a me sempre nemica Mi rnsospigne al loco, ov io mi sdegno Veder nel fango il bel tesoro mio: Amor sel 'cide, e sal Madonna, ed io. OTiLL have I sought a life of solitude ; The streams, the fields, the forests know my mind ; That I might scape the sordid, and the blind.

Who paths forsake trod by the wise, and good: Fain would I leave, were mine own will pursued. These Tuscan haunts, and these soft skies behind, Sorga's thick-wooded hills again to find ; And sing, and weep in concert with its flood.

But fortune, ever my sore enemy, Compels my steps, where I w ith sorrow see Cast my fair treasure in a vicious soil: Yet less a foe she justly deigns to prove, For once, to me, to Laura, and to love ; Fav'ring my song, my passion with her smile. Alma real, dignissima d' impero, Se nonfossifra noi scesa si tardo.

Per "coi conxen cli io arda, en toi respire: Ma 7 vento 7ie portava le parole. Ah mc, that lovely look! That gay demeanor blent with dignity! That speech, which could the soul from discord free, And to ingenuous could convert the base! Ah me, that smile by which the dart took place, Whence death ; nor hope 1 other destiny! Spirit, that worthy of a realm mightst be.

Less late adorning our unworthy race! For you I still will burn, for you respire ; Since yours through life I've been: My soul you fill'd with hope, and with desire, When last to these delighted eyes you liv'd: But now those words are all dispers'd in air. Ohe debh' iofar; che mi consigli, Amore? Tempo e ben di morire ; Ed ho tardato piu, cJi i non vorrei. Madonna e morta, ed ha seco 7 mio core ; E volendol seguirey Inter romper conven quest" anni rei: Perche mai vsder lei Di qua non spero, e V aspettar rn e noja, Poscia, ch' ogni mia gioja Per lo suo dipartire in pianto e folta ; Ogni dolcezza di mia vita e tolta.

Full time it is to die: And longer than I wish have I delay'd. My mistress is no more, and with her gone my heart; To follow her, I must need Break short the course of my afflictive years: To view her here helow I ne'er can hope ; and irksome 'tis to wait.

Since that my ev'ry joy By her departure unto tears is turn'd ; Of all its sweets my life has been depriv'd. Ed in un punto? And in one instant was its sun obscur'd. What genius can with words Rightly describe my lamentable state? Ah, blind, ungrateful world. Thou hast indeed just cause with me to mourn; That beauty, thou didst hold, with her is fled!

Perche cosa si bella Devea 7 cieV adornar di sua presenza. Questo ni avanza di cotanta spenc ; E questo solo ancor qui mi mantene.

For that, which is so fair, Should with its presence decorate the skies. But I, a wretch who, reft Of her, prize nor myself, nor mortal life, Recall her with my tears: This only of my hope's vast sum remains ; And this alone doth still support me here. Her viewless form inhabits paradise, Divested of that veil, Which shadow'd while below her bloom of life. Once more to put it on, And never then to cast it off again ; When so much more divine, And glorious render'd 'twill by us be view'd, As mortal beauty to eternal yields.

Quesf e del viver mio V una colonna: This is one pillar that sustains my life ; The other her dear name, That to my heart sounds so delightfully. She I trust sees it too, who dwells with truth. Ma e raiAona dentro in cotal modo: No wise for her, who, ris'n To so much peace, me has in warfare left ; Such, that should any shut The road to follow her, for some length of time What Love declares to me Alone would check my cutting through the tie: But in this guise he reasons from within.

It suits thee ill with the glad throng to stay. Thou sorrowing widow wrapt in garb of woe. Ma se consentimento e di dcstino ; Che pGss' io piu, se no aver V alma trista, Umidi gli ocehi sempre, e 7 viso chino ; O nostra fit a, cK e si hella in vista ; Com per dc agexolmcnte in un ynattino Quel, che 'n molC anni a gran pena s' acquista! Fah'n that proud Column, falln that Laurel tree, Whose shelter once relieved my wearied mind ; I 'm reft of what I ne'er again shall find, Though ransack'd every shore, and evVy sea: Double the treasure death has torn from me.

In whlcli life's pride was with its pleasure join'd ; Not eastern gems, nor the world's wealth combin'd, Can give it back, nor land, nor royalty. But, if so fate decrees, what can I more. Ah, what is life so lovely to the view! How quickly in one little morn is lost What years have won with labour, and with cost. Non X olendomi Amor perder ancora, Elbe un altro lacciuol fra V erha tesoj E di nov' esca un cdtrofoco acceso, Tal, cJi a gran pena indi scamp at o for a: That burning toil, in which I once was caught, While twice ten years and one I counted o'er.

That grief ne'er fatal proves I now am taught. But Love, who to entangle me still sought, Spread in the treach'rous grass his net once more.

So fed the fire with fuel as before, That my escape I hardly could have wrought. And, but that my first woes experience gave, Snared long since, and kindled I had been, And all the more, as I'm become less g-reen: And break my bond ; that flame now fades, and fail? Veggiofortuna in porto ; e stanco omai II mio nocchief ; e rotte arbore, e sartc ; E i lumi bci, che mirar soglio, spenti. LiiFE flies apace, and tarries not an hour ; While death behind with huge stride journeys on Events now present, with those past and gone.

And all the future too, my life doth sour. If aught of joy this sadden'd heart e'er knew, It starts on fancy: Good-fortune's wish'd-for port is now in view ; IVIy pilot's wearied ; rent my mast, and sail ; And those fair lights, that guided once, now fail. OE lamentar augelli, o "verdifronde Mover soavernente aW aura estiva j O roco mormorar d'l lucid" onde S" ode d' unajiorita, efresca inva ; La V io seggia d' amor pensoso, e scriva ; Lei che 7 ciel ne mo7istrd, terra n asconde, Veo-crio, cd odo, ed intendo: If in sweet accent moans the plaintive bird.

Or green groves whisper soft in summer air, Or from the fresh and flow'ry shore is heard Down the rock's side the fall of waters fair, There where I sit, enditing midst fond care ; Then she, whom heav'n just shew'd us, now interr'd, Whom my fond senses living yet declare. Answers from skies above each sigh preferr'd. Or in forma di Jiinfo, o d' altra diva, Che del pill chiaro fondo di Sorga esca, E pongasi a seder i? Most r undo in vista, che di me le 'ncresca. How often, dreading aught that may molest, I've roam'd to glooms and shades of privacy, Seeking the fair to fancy's view confest, Snatch'd hence by death, death to whom oft I cry!

Now like a naiad, or some form divine, From the translucent depth of Sorga sprung, And on its margin joying to recline, Have I beheld her; now, fresh meads among Treading the flowrets, like a moratl shine ; While on her bard a chiding glance she flung. E sol quant' tlla parUiy ho pace, o tregua. Ne'er did fond mother to her darling son, Or zealous spouse to her beloved mate Sage counsel give, in perilous estate.

With such kind caution, in such tender tone, As gives that fair-one, who, oft looking down On my hard exile from her heav'nly seat. With wonted kindness bends upon my fate Her brow, as friend or parent would have done: Now chaste affection prompts her speech, now fear. Instructive speech, that points what sev'ral ways To seek, or shun, while journeying here below; Then all the ills of life she counts, and prays iVIy soul ere long may quit this terrene sphere: And by her words alone I'm sooth'd, and freed from woe.

Ma io che debhofar del dolce alloro? I vostri dipartir nan soji si duri ; CK almen di notte suol tornar colei, Che non ha schifo le tue bianche chiome: When from the heav'ns I see Aurora beam, With rosy tinctur'd cheek, and golden hair; Love bids my face the hue of sadness wear: Thou knowest well the hour that shall redeem, Happy Tithonus, thy much valued fair ; But not to her I love can I repair, Till death extinguishes this vital flame.

Yet need'st thou not thy separation mourn ; Certain at evenins's close is the return Of her, who doth not thy hoar locks despise: But my nights sad, my days are render d drear, By her, who bore my thoughts to yonder skies. And only a remember'd name left here. Ed io pur vivo: Or sia qui fine al mio amoroso canto: Secca e la rena deK usato ingegno, E la cetera 7 iia rixolta in pianto.

Which made our eartli a p. Still life, O grief! O shaiiie I in me pievails; Thoigii a. Ah now no more my anj'rous strain siiall flow ; The custom d soiu'ce oi tuneful genius iails, And my lyre utters only sounds of woe! Ov e 7 valor, la conoscenza e 7 senno, U accorta, onesta, lanil, dolce favella?

Ove son le bellezze accolte in ella, Che gran tempo di me lor voglia jenno? Quanto al misero f? Where is that countenance, whose slightest sign Could turn my easy heart now here, now there? Where those fine brows? Their orbs of radiance where, That on my being did so kindly shine? Where now is m orth, which sense and knowledge join ; That tender accent, modest, courteous, clear?

Where those united graces which endear, And which long time to rule me did combine? Where now the tempered scorn on beauty's face, Which o'er my soul has cast a grateful gloom. When there my hopes, or fears I wont to trace? And where is she, whose charms have seal'd my doom? Ah what the loss this sad world must sustain. And these fond eyes that ne'er from weeping shall refrain! WiiAT envy do I bear thee, greedy clay ; Who dost her wrested from my sight embrace ; Dost with me too dispute that lovely face, Whose beauties chasVl my warring woes away!

What do I bear the heav'ns, that fold, and stay, And midst themselves so eagerly could place That spirit freed from its fair mortal case ; Heav'ns, that to others rarely ope their way! What envy bear those favourVl souls, to whom Her sweet, and saintly intercourse is known ; To which desirous long I made pretence!

Qutnci vedea 7 mio bene ; e per quesf ormc Tor no a vcder, end' a I del nuda e git a Lasciando in terra la sua bella spoglia. I see, as from those tracks I bend mine eyes, Her, who on earth has cast her mortal load, And, an uncumbcr'd sj irit, rcach'd the skies.

Ixifra lor, che 7 terzo ctrchio serra. La rividi piii bella, e meno altera. Per man mi prese, e disse: JVlY fancy bore me to that region, where Dwells her I seek, on earth yet cannot find ; Again I saw her amid those, consign'd To the third lieav'n, less haughty, and more fair. She took my hand, and thus did she declare: For words thus chastely, pitcously exprest.

Had nearly rcndcr'd me heav'n's lasting guest. Fior, frondi, erbe, ombre, antri, onde, aure soavi, Valli chmse, aJti colli, e piagge apricke, Porto delV amorose miefatiche, Delle fortune mie tante, e si gravi: Ye flow'rsj soft airs, streams, verdures spreading wide, Ye grots, close vales, proud hills, and sunny plain, Who form the port my am'rous toils attain, Where my oppressive, num'rous sorrows hide! O sportful tenants of the leafy woods! O naiad throng, and ye who batt'ning range In grassy cool depths of the crystal floods!

My days, so brilliant once, grow dark of late ; E'en dark as death, that wroutrht the cruel chantje. La falsa opinion dal cor s' e tolfa, Che mifece alcun tempo aeerba, e dura Tua dolce vista: Ore giace 7 tuo albergo, e dove nacque II nostro amor, t'o' cli abbandoni, e lasce, Per non veder ne' tuoi quel, cli a te spiacque.

Bright spirit, from those earthly bonds releas'd, The loveliest ever wove in nature's loom, From thy bright skies compassionate the gloom Shrouding my life that once of joy could taste! Each false suggestion of thy heart has ceas'd, That whilom bade thee stern disdain assume; Now all secure, heav'n's habitant become, List to my sighs, thy looks upon me cast. Mark the huge rock, whence Sorga's waters rise ; And see amidst its waves, and borders stray One fed by grief, and mem'ry that ne'er dies ; But from that spot O turn thy sight away Where I hrst lov'd, where thy late dwelling lies; That in thy friends thou nought ungrateful mayst survey!

X' aria, e V acqua, e la terra e d'' amor piena. Ogni aniwM d' amar si riconsiglia. E cantar augelletti, ejiorir piagge, E 'n belle donne oneste atti soavi Sono un deserto, efere aspre, e selvagge. The blossom'd meads, the choristers of air.

Sweet courteous damsels can delight no more ; Each face looks savage, and each prospect drear. E tiitta notte par che w' accompagne, E nic rammente la m'la dura sorte: Que duo bei lumi assai piii che 7 sol chiari Chi penso mai vederfar terra oscura? Y ON nightingale that pours forth tuneful wail For its dear mate, or haply for its young, Fills all tlie vaulted heav'n, and echoing dale With siicli sweet-modulated, plaintive song; Alethinks it joins my melancholy tale, Reminding me of woe the whole night long: That death o'er charms divine could ne'er prevail I ween'd, but now lament a thought so wrong.

Who seeks security doth vainly stray: Ah me, that unto murky earth should turn Those eyes which far outshone the radiant day! The precept my hard fortune would convey I now perceive ; to live, to weep, and learn Of cv'ry bliss below how transient is the stay. JN OR beamy stars that climb the blue serene ; Nor fresh-trimm'd vessel riding the smooth sea ; Nor knights stretch'd o'er the plain in arm'd array ; Nor deer brisk-bounding forest glades between ; Nor early tidings of some good foreseen ; Nor love's exalted, and embellishM lay ; Nor beauteous damsels warbling carols gay Near limpid fountain, or in meadow green ; Nor aught delightful shall this heart hold dear, Which deep entombed with my lov'd Laura lies.

Late the sole liglit, and mirror of these eyes! Gia incominciava a prender sicurtade La mia car a 7iemica a poco a poco De' suol sospetti ; e rivolgeva in gioco Mie pene acerbe sua dolce onestade: Morte ebbe invidia al miojelice sfato, Anzi alia speme; e fcglisi all' incontra A mezza via, come neinico armato.

NlY verdurous, and bloomy prime was past; More faintly glow'd my bosom's scorching flame ; And to that portion of my days I came, When life declining to its end doth haste: JVIy hostile fair suspicion had nigh ceas'd.

Of insecurity did little dream j Oftimes my tender sorrows were her theme, On which some courteous merriment she cast: Now time at length that sober period brought, When chastity might fondness safely greet, And social lovers speak each inmost thought: Then death, invidious of a joy so sweet E'en in expectance, cross'd me on my road.

And, like an armed foe, despoil'd me of my good. Ho servifo a signor crudele, e scarso: CK arsiy quanto 7 miofoco ehbi davante ; Or vo piangendo il suo cenere sparso.

Which made these eyes, while heav'n was willing, shew Wishful, and gay ; now sad, and never dry. O thoughts of vanity! Witherd the grass, the rills of turbid hue ; And void, and cheerless is that dwelling too, Where I could both have wish'd to live, to die ; Hoping its mistress might at length afford Some respite to my woes by plaintive sighs.

And sorrows pour'd from her once-burning eyes. I've servd a cruel, and ungrateful lord: While liv'd my beauteous flame, my heart he fir'd: And o'er its ashes now 1 weep expir'd.

AM dispietata morte, ahi crudel vita: U una m ha posto in doglia, E mie speranze acerbamente ha spente: Z' altra tni ten quaggiii contra mia voglia; E lei, che sen' e git a, Seguir non posso ; cK' ella nol consente: Y ES, Love, at that propitious time When hope was in its bloomy prime. And when I vainly fancied nigh The meed of all my constancy ; Then sudden she, of whom I sought Compassion, from my sight was caught.

The one has sunk me deep in care. And darken'd cruelly my day, That shone with hope's enliv'ning ray: Ite, rime dolcnti, al duro sasso, Che 7 mio caro tesoro in terra asconde: Ivi chiamatey chi dal del risponde ; Benche 7 mortal sia in loco oscuro, e basso. Ditele cK i son gia di viver lasso, Del navigar per queste orribiV onde: Ma, ricogliendo le sue spartefronde, Dietro le vo pur cosi passo passo. Go, plaintive verse, to the dull marble go, Which hides in earth my treasure from these eyes j There call on her who answers from yon skies, Although the mortal part dwells dark and low.

Of life how I am wearied make her know. But, copying all her virtues I so prize, Her track I follow, yet my steps are slow. I sing of her, living, or dead, alone ; Dead did I say? She is immortal made! That by the world she should be lov'd, and known. O, in my passage hence may she be near, To greet my coming that's not long delay'd ; And may I hold in heav'n the rank herself hold there!

DogUom' io soly ne soV ho da dokrme: Che svelf hai di virtute il chiaro germe, Spento il primo valor, qualjla il secondo? Non la conobbe il mondo, mentre V ebbe: ConobbiC io, cli' a pianger qui ramasi ; E 7 cicl, che del mio pianto or si fa hello. Love blind, and strip'd of arms ; Left mirth despoil'd ; beauty bereav'd of charms ; And me self- wearied, to myself a prey ; Left vanish'd, sunk whate'er was courteous, gay: I only weep, yet all must feel alarms: If beauty's bud the hand of rapine harms It dies, and not a second views the day!

Let air, earth, ocean weep for human kind ; For human kind, depriv'd of Laura, seems A tlow'rless mead, a ring whose gem is lost None knew her worth, while to this orb confin'd, Save nie lier bard, whose sorrow ceaseless streams, And heav'n that's made more beauteous at my cost. Si paragona pur coi piii pe? To mark my progress, and my coming wait ; Now uiy whole thought, my wish to heavn I cast; "Tis Laura's voice I hear, and hence she bids me haste.

With which nor gold, nor sinibeam could compare; The sweetest accent, and a smile all grace ; Hands, arms, that would e'en motionless abase Those who to love the most rebellious were ; Fine, nimble feet ; a form that would appear Like that of lier, who first did Eden trace: These fann'd life's spark Now heav'n, and all its choir Of angel hosts those kindred charms admire; While lone, and darkling I on earth remain: Yet is not comfort fled ; she, who ran read Each secret of my soul, shall intercede ; And I her sainted form behold auain.

She leads me to her Lord: Preferring humble pray"r, he would allow That I his glorious face, and hers might see. Tuy che vedi i miei mali indegniy ed empi, Re del cielo invisibile, immortale ; Soccorri alV alma disviata, efrale, E 7 suo difdto di tua grazia adempi. Sicchh, s io vissi in guerra, ed in tempesta ; Mora in paee, ed in porto: A quel poco di viver, che m avanza ; Ed al inorir, degni esser tua man presta: Tu sai ben, che 'n altrui non ho speranza.

Still do I weep the days that are gone by, When sublunary things my fondness sway'd. And no bold flight, though having wings, I made, Haply to give of me examples high. Thou, who my impious, foul misdeeds dost spy, Dread Lord of heaven immortal, viewless! Thus if life's warfare, and its storm I prov'd, Peace, and a harbour may in death be mine: Though vain my stay, I'll worthily depart.

For that short period ere I'm hence remov'd, And at the last, extend thy hand divine: Thou knowst, that thou alone giv'st hope unto my heart. Cost sapessi il mio simile stato ; Verresti in grembo a questo sconsolato A partir seco i doloroei guai, T non sd se le parti sarian pai ; Che quella, cui tu piangi, Iforse in vita ; Di cK a me morte, e 7 ciel son tanto avari. Ma la stagione, e V or a men gradita. Col memhrar de dolci anni, e degli amari, A parlar teco con pieth rri invita.

Vet would thy share of woe not equal mine, Since the lov'd mate thou weep'st may haply live: While death, and heav'n, me of my fair deprive: But hours less gay, the season's drear decline ; With thoughts on many a sad, and pleasant year. Tempt me to ask thy piteous presence here. In this first Sonnet, which serves as a proem to the Sonnets in general, the classic reader will perceive how closely Horace is copied in the fourth, ninth, and tenth lines of the Italian.

A translation in old English of the present poem may be found in the same collection of Sunges and Sonnettes as contain the preceding prefatory Sonnet in black letter; it is entitled: The lover asketh pardon of his passed JoUy in love.

This stands as the first of the many Sonnets Petrarch com- posed, to celebrate that memorable day, which gave such co- lour to his life, when he first saw Laura at the church of St. A well-educated lady, named Giustina I;evi Perotti of Sasso- ferrato, daughter of Andrea Perotti of the ancient, and illus- trious house of Levi, was enthusiastically fond of poetry ; and this turn having drawn upon her the raillery of some of her friends, she consulted Petrarch in a Sonnet whether he would advise her to indulge it.

He answered her by the present Sonnet, which is composed of the same rhymes with that the lady sent. In the twelfth line of the original some few edi- tions have I'alta via. Petrarch, it would appear, sometimes amused himself with the sports of the field. Having one day caught a brace of birds, which some contend were woodpigeons, others par- tridges, in the country near Laura's birth-place, he sent tliem to a friend, probably James Colonna, the bishop, with the present Sonnet, which the birds themselves are supposed to speak, although in no living state, as is evident from the eleventh line.

This composition is by the Abbe de Sade re- ferred to the year Tassoni, who is often humorous, as well as severe, in his criticisms on Petrarch, observes with respect to the first eight lines, that, V ordine e piil sconvolto, e ritorto, che non e la coda del gran diatolo. What else can account for " your so constantly wearing that veil; whether the sun re- " quires it, or no; whether it be warm, or cold? Tacitus attributes a similar artifice of the veil to Poppea: Vclata parte oris, ne satiaret aspectum, vcl quia sic dccebat.

In what high estimation Petrarch was held by the writers, particularly the amatory poets, in the beginning of the l6th century, is evident from their frequent translations, and imi- tations of his verse.

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, and Sir Thomas Wyat the elder, two of the most polite scholars, and gentlemen of Henry the eighth's court, are striking instances of this: As a specimen of Eord Surrey's manner, I will give his translation entire of this first Camonc of Petrarch, which he entitles: I never savve my ladie laye apart Her cornet blacke, in colde nor yet in heate, Sith fyrst she knew my griefe was growen so greate, Whyche other fansies dryveth from my harte, That to myselfe I do the thought reserve, The whyche unwares dyd wound my woful brest, But on her face mine eies mought never rest: Yet synce 1 knew I dyd her love and serve, Her golden tresses cladde allway with blacke ; Her smyleying lookes that had thus evermore, And that restraynes which I desire so sore: So doth this cornet governe mee, alacke!

In somer sunne, in winter's breathe, a frost Wherebye the lyghte of her fayre lookes 1 lost. Petrarch is supposed to have written this Sonnet during the year In the seventh line he takes occasion to mention, as he does in other parts of his poems, the very garment, and its colour, which Laura had on the first day he saw her. Tassoni calls those sighs of Laura in her old-age, mentioned m the last line: See the note to Sonnet L The metaphor taken up in the fifth line is evidently in imitation of Horace.

This Sonnet, Castelvetro observes, is grounded upon the Platonic philosophy. The soul of the lover is said lo reside in the beloved object, not in the lover's self: The second line of this Canzone I have not translated ; the exception it affects seems little pertinent, and meant only to in- troduce scriptural quotation, which we shall find cur bard fre- quently aimed at.

See the royal Psalter, Psalm The sixth stanza, wherein the storv of Pha'hus and Daphne is evidently alluded to, has been adduced by the Abbe de Sade, in his Mtmoircs, as a proof, among many others, that eur i oet's pa?

This Sonnet is supposed to have been written during a dan- gerous illness that befel Laura, from a disorder then prevalent at Avignon, occasioned by the extreme drought of the season; at which time she appeared to Petrarch as a vision in his sleep.

Lucifer, or the morning star, and Callisto, or the greater bear, are the only stars that are brightened by the rising sun ; all the other stars grow dim, and disppear. See the metamorphosis of Callisto in Hyginus, Fab. Petrarch had planted a laurel by the side of a stream, to which Laura in her walks frequently resorted ; and he im- plores Apollo to protect it.

Our Poet affected a partiality for the laurel, by reason of its coincidence with the name of his mistress Laura; and he presumes that Apollo entertained the same partiality, by reason of his beloved Daphne being trans- formed into that tree, on the banks of the river Peneus.

This will sufficiently explain the Sonnet, and its concetti which are almost untranslatable. It is uncertain at what period, or upon what occasion, Pe- trarch composed this Sonnet ; it may perhaps be referred to the year , as it seems to be written in the same frame of mind with other poems he composed in that year.

This is one of the most sportive of Petrarch's Sonnets. He complains that Laura by frequent contemplation of her beauty in the looking-glass, which he calls his rival, grows too fond of herself, and neglects him.

This Sonnet is supposed to have been written , about the same time with Canzone IV. Petrarch here accuses his tongue, his tears, and his sighs of not doing him the same justice, in the declaration of his passion, as his countenance does him.

Sir Thomas Wyat the elder has translated this Sonnet, entitling it: Against his long that failed to utter his sutler'. Peiraroli liere complains of the wretchedness of his con- dition, by comparing it w'ith that o! The perpetual allusions to Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, in his choice of imagery, it is needless to point out to the classic reader.

The fourth Italian stanza would perhaps inform us, that this Ode was composed about the year , nearly teji years Cben presso al decim' anno after he first saw Laura. Curoe non ipsa in morte relinquunt. And, from the conclusion, Castelvetro, with Daniello would infer, that it was written in the space of a day ; which, observes Tassoni, is probable enough: Propertius expresses a like sentiment to that contained in the conclusion of this Canzone.

Laus in amore mori. This is the first of three successive Canzoni, the most cele- brated of all Petrarch's poetical compositions, written at Vau- cluse, about the year They are addressed to the eyes of his mistress ; and have acquired the appellations of " tha three Sisters," " the three Graces," " the three Divinities.

Even the severe Tassoni denominates them " the Queens of song," affirming, that they might alone entitle their author to the laurel crown. And Muratori insists, that every reader of taste must allow, that Italian poetry can boast of nothing more exquisite. The Abbe de Sade, however, does not find them wholly void of defects. This Sonnet, though it may not perhaps rank among the highest of poetic excellence, is yet valuable, as it informs us, that our poet had employed Simon Memmi of Siena, a celebrated artist of that day, to paint Laura's picture: Vasari remarks upon these two Sonnets, that Simon would be more obliged to them for future fame than to all the pictures he ever painted ; the former might be transmitted to latest posterity, time must inevitably destroy the latter.

Petrarch evidently wrote these lines when Laura was no longer in her bloom, and, as is supposed, about the year His description of her charms is perhaps imitated from A'ir- gil, JEncid. Some pretend, that a noble friend of our po,et's, desirous of seeing such a miracle of beauty, ex- pressed, on being introduced to her, much disappointment ; on which occasion Petrarch presented him this Sonnet. In the concluding line we trace the old Latin proverb: Gladius rdusus non sanat vubiiis. Cino of Pistoia was an eminent civilian, who read lectures at Bologna, where Petrarch, when young, studied under him ; he was also an elegant poet, which endeared him to his pupil, who thus laments his loss.

The citizens of Pistoia are called perverse, for some neglect towards so celebrated a cha- racter. The turn of this Sonnet is not unlike that of the third Carmen of Catullus: Liigde, 6 Veneres, Cupklincsqitc. The Abbe de Sade supposes, that our bard had in the present cor- rected the Sonnet of his friend Beccari. It was perhaps writ- ten in the year As Cesar disguised his joy by tears, so Hannibal concealed his grief by laughter.

Petrarch alludes to these two circumstances, as related the one by Tucan, and the other by Livy. See also Livy, Lib, This is one of the Sonnets, in which our poet inveighs against the pro0igacy of the court of Avignon, designating it by the appellation of Babylon ; it is not however one of those condemned by Papal power, and suppressed in some edi- tions of his works.

We may perhaps date it about the year The last terzetto has a reference to his mistress Laura; and his friend Stephen Colonna, who was driven from Rome by the Orsini faction, and consequently insecure in his sta- tion. Some pretend that a fit of the gout, which the Cardi- nal laboured under, is here alluded to.

Petrarch taking leave of Laura, previous to his departure from Avignon, in , she became sensibly afi'ected, and turned pale. This much admired Canionc is always accompanied wiiii nnother, which succeeds it: Gravina calls these Canzoni " The two pretty Sisters. They were both written probably in the year Commentators have been unnecessarily divided respecting the locality of the country alluded to.

Supposing, as the Italians generally do, that Laura lived at Cabrieres, and that Petrarch fixed his residence at Vaucluse, for the sake of being near, and gaining opportunities of seeing her, the scene must then of course lie between these two places, on the banks of the Sorga: Voltaire indeed, who translated the second of these pieces, makes it addressed to the Fountam of Vaucluse ; whereas Vellutello, Tassoiii, and others assert, perhaps er- roneously, that the present Canzone was composed on the banks of the Coulon, a muddy stream about a mile distant from Cabrieres, where the country is not very inviting ; and the second only on the banks of the Sorga.

Petrarch affects a scriptural quotation, so frequent with him, in the beginning of this Sonnet. And he then relates his wretch- edness under four different similitudes. In the last line, the play upon his mistress's name, as L' aura the gale cannot escape the Italian reader. It was probably written in the year , when Petrarch's mind was more particularly distracted with the hopes and fears of his passion. The chain of antithesis it contains would remind us of the 8 th Banium of Bonefonius: W't may be also led to fancy, that we can trace in it the following stanza, which be- gins a little poem composed by our royal Elizabeth, " upon INIountZeurs departure.

I greeve yet dare not shewe my discontent, I love and yet am forst to seeme to hate, I doe yet dare not say I ever meant, I seeme starke mute but inwardly doe prate, I am and not, I freeze and yet am burn'd, Since from myself my other selfe I turn'd. That the higher ranks of Queen Elizabeth's day were con- versant with Petrarch is evident from this very Sonnet, with others of his, being found faithfully translated into old Englibh in Harrington's Ntigct Antiques, Vol. Description of the contrarlous passions oj a loicr.

This Sonnet, a translation of which is found in Harring- ton's Nugcc Anti nta: It stands the first of those three condemned by the court of Rome, and suppressed m uU the then printed editions, oi I'etruich's poetry; they have consequently found 11 but few translators, or commentators. Some ridiculously enough pretend, that this poetical invective was meant against a noble lady of the house of Medici, for whom our bard had reason to enter- tain an aversion: In the seventh line of the present we may trace the first of Sonnet III.

Among the poems of Sir Thomas Wyat the elder we find a translation of the present piece. The Abbe de Sade would refer this Canzone to the year , when Petrarch vainly fancied that Laura gave some encouragement to his passion.

But Vellutello would refer it to the year , when he was graciously received by her, on his return from Italy, making the visit he promises himself in Sonnet XXIX. I cannot forbear giving the Italian reader a specimen of Tassoni's mirthful criticism, in his remark on the first two lines of this poem: Quel farsi nien duro il riso, t qua- litd pill convenevole al riso, die si cuoce per mincstra, die non r quello, chc si fa coUa bocca.

The measure, and arrangement of the rhymes, in this translation, are exactly conformable to those of the original. From the present Sonnet we may conjecture, that Laura was a dark-eyed beauty. The conceit of Cupid making her eyes his armoury, there finisliing his golden arrows, is elegant; and his picture of the little deity truly classical. To the bard, who could so paint him, may be applied those lines of Pro- pertius, Eleg.

Quiainque illefuit puertim qui pinxit Amorenif Nonne putas miras hunc habuisse manus? The three last lines rather betray a vain glory. Ermessenda her mother, and Paul de Sade her father-in-law, I believe, both died that year. Burney, in his History of Musick, Fol. The Platonists, and some other philosophers, pretended that in heaven were kept the ideas, or models of every ani- mal, and of all created beings ; to which opinion the begin- ning of our Sonnet alludes.

By the chiefest of Laura's vir- tues is meant chastity, wbich precluded all pretension to the indulgence of passion. And in the conclusion of the Sonnet we evidently trace Horace, Ode Duke ridentcni Lalagtn amabo, Duke laquentem. This Sonnet points out the custom, which the ladies of Avignon still observe, of bathing in the Rhone during the warm summer months: Some commentators pretend that the Sorga, others that the Lumergue, or the Coulon, both running near Cabrieres, i the puro Jiume alluded to ; but the two last are certainly only poor muddy streams.

The Power of Love is intended in the eighth line ; and similar to the last line is the idea of our amorous English poet, Sedley: Cupid that lover weakly strikes, Who can express what 'tis he likes. With the same thought too Samuel Daniel concludes his first Sonnet: Who can shew all his love, doth love but lightly.

Petrarch wrote the present Sonnet in the spring of , after taking that tender farewell of Laura to which he alludes in that beautiful one. Quel xago impaUidir, SfC. The Po running from w est to east, it of course quits the westward situation of Avignon, the resi- dence of the bright Laura, to meet the nsing sun.

Tassoni highly extols this Sonnet, as a masterly composi- tion ; and the Abbe de Sade adduces it, as aiuhentically desig- nating one of the gay suits of Laura's apparel, which, from the sixth line, it would seem she then chose to have put on for the first time. Petrarch is supposed to have written it in ihe year In this jour- ney he had a fall from his horse, which greatly endangered him. In the fourth line a conceit is intended: Laura L'aura, the gale occasioned Petrarch both grief, and renown; by his unfortunate passion, and by his celebrated verse.

Petrarch, herein, alludes to that period of time when he first knew Laura, and that she was yet a young married woman, having scarce left off her girlish attire, but still wearing her hair in a negligent unornamented style: Jttrif in the fifth line, implies her husband. The lovely Laura combing and adjusting her beautiful tresses, is designated by the gale sporting with them ; and, as it were, performing the office of her fingers.

By twofold, in the tenth line, our poet alludes to the brightness both of the eyes, and haij of his mistress. Laura, be- ing at a public assembly, dropt her glove, which Petrarch, ever attentive to her, picked up, and would fain have detained; she however with some vivacity took it from him, though he reluctantly resigned it: Our poet in the second obscure line, which I have rendered verbatim, perhaps only meant to give the literal of a familiar figurative expression: It was written , when Laura, on some occasion, doubted her Poet's passion.

The two last lines have been usually quoted, with what propriety I cannot see, in the notes to Gray's Elegy, as giving the hint of the following stanza in it: E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. Our poet, I believe, meant to say, that the warmth, ant genius of his verse, when he and his mistress were no more, would inspire many a future lover.

Our poet in the eight line evidently had his eye upon Ovid: Eligc cui dicas, tu mihi sola places. This Sonnet was written in the year , betwsen Lyons and Avignon, riding by the side of the Rhone ; and he erro- neously makes this river derive its name from the Latin, or Italian, rodere ; though Pliny, and some others derive it from Rhoda, a city of Spain, whose inhabitants once peopled its banks; but it is perhaps more properly derived from the Celtic rhedeg, to flow rapidly, according to Father Pezron.

In like manner Horace speaks of the Liris eating its way: Non rura, quce Liris quietd Mordet aqud taciturnus amnis. By the plain, in the seventh line, is intended the country about Avignon, where Laura then dwelt. And in the last line the original is literally scriptural. It appears from one of his Epistles, written , that Petrarch lost the freshness of youth at an early period of life ; owing, as he says, to the perpetual discord between his soul and his body.

One of his friends remarking, that such a change could be no other than the effect of sorcery, the poet replied to him in the present Sonnet. In Petrarch's day, the fine ladies literally rose with the sun ; and it would appear from this, as well as from a variety of other Sonnets, that our bard was accustomed to take his early morning-walk near Laura's habitation, to gain a sight of her at her window.

Aurora is alluded to in the fifth line, who was wedded to Titlionus, a beautifid youth, for whom she obtained immortality, but whom she could not exempt froni old-age ; the gods therefore in compassion transformed him to a grashopper. It would seem probable, that Laura wore her hair, as might be tlie custom of those days, flowing over either shoulder. Lips, and teeth are here poetically denominated roses, and pearls. In the ninth line, allusion is made to the Pythagorean doctrine of the musick of the spheres.

Jn the beginning of this Sonnet the poet evidently had his f. JNTcc cum invcctus cquis altinn petit cethera ; nee cum Prcccipitem oceani rubra lavit cequore cut rum. It is pretty closely translated by Sir Thomas Wyat the elder, he names it: Charging of his love as unpiteous, and loving other.

Samuel Daniel too had an eye to it in his fifteenth Sonnet to Delia. In the eighth line we readily trace Horace: Ncc tiiictus viola pallor amantium. Sir William Jones, in the preface to his poetical Trans- lations from the Asiatic languages, observes thus: Some pretend, that Petrarch wrote this Canzone as he was passing the river Durance, which he designates, in the last stanza, by the expression dMre onde, and that be meant to send it to Laura, on the next day, at Avignon.

The fourth line of the first stanza, and the same of the fifth stanza, are almost literally Virgil's: Quant multa in sylvis aciwn se millia condunf. On the sixth stanza the Abbe de Sade has bestowed a simi- lar comment to that on the same stanza of Ode II, to which the reader may refer. This Sonnet was written on the same occasion as the eighteenth.

Herein Petrarch describes the agitation of his mind after parting from Laura, possessed with the idea that some misfortune would happen to her. By fomgOy in the eleventh line, is meant the licentious city of Avignon, where his valued Laura dwelt. As the three last lines in the original are so very obscure, and have been so variously interpreted. I only give the general idea, that fortune, in some one particular instance, was less unkind to our bard.

Many pretend that he alludes to a re- conciliation with his mistress, when she cordially took him by the hand j others, that she favourably received from him some poetry he had written her. But, as the Abbe de Sade observes, the reader must form his own conjecture.

This is the first of the Sonnets of Petrarch's second Book ; and the succeeding Sonnets, and Odes are from the same. All the poems of that hook were written after Laura's death, and most of them may be considered as so many elegies on the subject.

A manuscript copy of this Canzone is said to have been found in Petrarch's own hand writing, wherein he begins it thus: Amor in pianto ogni mio 7-iso c voltOf Ogn allegrezza in doglia, Ed t oscurato il sole a gli occhi miei ; Ogni dolce pensicr del cor m e tolto, E sol ivi una doglia Rimasa m' e dijinir gli anni rei, E di seguir cold.

La qual di qua rcdere omai nan spero. He had written in the margin at top: Our poet's allusions to the doctrines of Platonism cannot escape the intelligent reader, particularly in the fourth stanza, where- in he speaks of the soul as V inxisibil forma.

His address in the last line: Upon the whole, the present poem would remind us of that reasoning on suicide, which oor Shakspeare holds in the celebrated soliloquy of his Hamlet: These esteemed personages died within three months of each other of the plague, which so ravaged Europe in the year Sir Thomas Wyat the elder has imitated it under the title of: The lover laments the death of his love.

Curious, and interesting is the present Sonnet, in as much as it informs us of a circumstance in Petrarch's life, less touched upon than any other by his biographers, namely, that, after the decease of his beloved Laura, he had nearly engaged in a new amour, which was only interrupted by the death of its fair object. Petrarch first saw Laura She died , which explains the second line. Parallel passages to the beginning of this Sonnet may be found in many of the ancient poets ; for instance, in Horace, LibiO..

O- irt Virgil, Giorg. The port he alludes to, in the twellth line, is either old-age, or the grave, both of which ex- tihguish the turbulent passions. And the lights, in the last line, may either imply his mistress Laura, and bis friend Co- lotma, or the eyes of Laura only. It is supposed to be one of those tributary compositions to the memory of his mistress, which, we are told, Petrarch de- lighted to make at the return of spring. See the note to Son- net II.

This present, similar in subject to the preceding Sonnet, was evideully composed at Vaucluse. Tassoni says, this Sonnet may rank among those of the very first class. Fondly enihusiastick was the imagination of Petrarch, who fancied that his beloved friend and mistress visited him after death, to warn him against the evils of this life, and prepare him for eternity. The last line of the original exhibits one of our bard's favour- ite scriptural quotations: The present Sonnet would seem modelled after the following lines from Statius, Lib.

It is highly extolled by La Ceva, for its skilful manage- ment in the introduction of those objects which excite Pe- trarch's envy, namely, earth, heaven, the blessed spirits above, and lastly death itself. This Sonnet would appear to have been written near Vau- cluse; the spot discovering a view of the country round, and its different interesting objects, the vale in which Avignon was situate, the road to it, the river Sorga, and some adjacent hill.

La Ceva bestows the most enthusiastic encomium on the present Sonnet: Yet he with great propriety crititises it, for having improperly blended the christian with the pagan mythology. In the beginning our poet places Laura in ihe third heaven, or sphere of Venus, according to the Platonists; and, in the first terzetto, he makes her speak as a christian, of the resurrection of the body.

SONNET LVIL The three last lines of this Sonnet have undergone much fanciful, and far-fetched interpretation; but I believe the sim- ple idea Petrarch wished to express is, that the departure of Laura had caused all his days to become gloomy as that power Death which occasioned it. And lie concludes with observing, that we all have from our birth our particular des- tinies allotted us. Whether he alludes to any unfortunate circumstance in Laura's own family, or to the vicious manners of the inha- bitants of the place in general, has been doubted.

Perhaps be may refer to something temporary, of which we can have no knowledge. This beautiful Sonnet, wherein Petrarch seems to have had an eye to the beginning oi the ilrst book, of Lucretius, was most probably written at Vaucluse, , on the same oc- casion with Sonnets II. Love and mirth are the keys alluded to in the eleventh line, says Castelvetro. Login; Create an account 2 commenti. Se non disponete di un account Paypal non potrete più utilizzare Chatroulette.

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